Brooklyn Raga Massive All-Stars Perform Terry Riley’s “In C” Podcast- 119

Play


Podcast Download

 


02343

The Brooklyn Raga Massive All-Stars perform a live, in-studio performance of Terry Riley’s masterpiece, “In C” live on the airwaves of WKCR-FM NY. Riley was deeply influenced by his studies of Hindustani vocal music but according to the composer himself, as far as he knows, the Massive is the only group that performs  “In C” with an ensemble of mostly Indian instruments. The group includes  sitars, tablas, sarods, bansuri, vocals, cello, guitars, vibes, dilruba, and more.

Screen Shot 2014-11-11 at 12.41.04 PM
We packed 16 musicians into the tiny live room at WKCR!

Led by Neel Murgai, on sitar, the group’s lineup for this broadcast is:

Neel Murgai, sitar
Camila Celin, sarod
Eric Fraser, bansuri
Sameer Gupta, tabla
Ehren Hanson, tabla
Andrew Shantz, harmonium, vocals
Dawood Kringle, dilruba
David Ellenbogen, guitar
Michael Gam, bass
Dana Leong, cello
Christian VerHalen, guitar
Vin Scialla, vibes
Joel Harrison, guitar
Timothy Hill, vocals
Alan Rigoletto, guitar
Timothy Hill, vocals
Rima Fand, violin

10382376_850888638255297_755030566747398926_o
The BRM-All Stars Performing “In C” at Art Cafe

Brooklyn Raga Massive began in the Fall of 2011 as a cooperative alliance between several Indian Classical Musicians in the Brooklyn, NYC area. Brooklyn Raga Massive is not a band, and it is not an exclusive club with members. The Massive is a platform for all lovers of Raga music, listeners and practitioners, to get closer to the pulse of NYCs live Raga music scene. The Brooklyn Raga Massive is managed by artists, and is meant to help bring the community of Raga lovers together. The Massive’s collaborative approach towards unifying and building the scene of Raga music in NYC leads its members towards each other, as well as provides the spark for the Brooklyn Raga Massive events and gatherings. The Massive is dedicated to presenting and representing Indian Classical Music in all its diversity of today.

The Brooklyn Raga Massive has a weekly residency at the “Art Cafe”- 884-886 Pacific St., Brooklyn, New York 11238.  Every Wednesday night from 8pm-11pm $5-10 admission

Abdoulaye Alhassane plays the music of the Sahara Desert live – Podcast 49

Play

Podcast Download

 

Abdoulaye Alhassane performs live with Deep Sahara at WKCR in 2010.  w/ Yacouba Diabate (Kora) Frederika Krier (Violin) and David Ellenbogen (guitar)

By Banning Eyre | April, 2007 [guitar player mg]
Abdoulaye Alhassane Toure has brought string-picking wizardry from the desert towns of West Africa to the nightclubs of New York City. Born in 1963, in Niamey, Niger, to a Sonrai family from Gao, Mali, he passed his youth in a multi-ethnic neighborhood surrounded by Peul, Bambara, Sonrai, and other peoples, and as he put it, “They all played music.” Local radio filled his ears with the sinuous, bluesy strains of desert folklore and the melodious bombast of Mande griots. When his parents returned to Mali, Toure recalled, “They came back with cassettes by Ibrahim Hamma Dicko, Fissa Maiga, and Ali Farka Toure, who sang in a language we understood, and I was incredibly inspired by the originality of this music.” Toure’s musical gift became obvious when he started hanging out in the Niamey nightclub where his uncle, Johnny Ali Maiga, led a band.
“Johnny Ali Maiga played folklore, like Ali Farka Toure,” said Toure, “But he also loved rock. His group was on the radio in Niamey, and it sounded like the Malian music I was listening to at home, but sung in Zerma, the national language of Niger.”
By the early ’80s, Toure was playing guitar and flute, and his first band incorporated electric guitar, bass, drums, and brass, and merged regional folk styles with international pop. When the group took first prize in a national competition, Toure became a full-time musician. By the late ’80s, he was leading Super Kassey—the first Niamey band to travel abroad and record in a modern studio.
Before long, Toure was working as a guitar instructor at the European-run Center for the Education and Promotion of Music. In 1992, Toure teamed up with singer/flutist Yacouba Moumouni to create Niger’s most successful roots pop band to date, Mamar Kassey. Mamar Kassey’s two electrifying CDs, Denke Denke (1999) and Alatoumi (2000) showcase Toure’s guitar mastery and formidable arranging skills. The music is rooted in tradition, but molded into brisk arrangements that include key modulations and bursts of solo improvisation.
“Improvisation existed in Sonrai music,” explained Toure, “but in another form. In our ceremonies, there’s an original melody that is played by the kurbu [a 3-stringed lute]. When the energy rises between the players and the dancers, the kurbu player leaves his melody, and follows his heart. But if you tell that kurbu player to work with a modern group and ‘improvise,’ you have to explain to him what it means.”
Mamar Kassey’s travels eventually brought Toure to New York City, where he now lives and performs with his current band, Deep Sahara. Toure can cradle an acoustic guitar and fingerpick his way through desert trance grooves, and he can also take up a flatpick, and wail on electric—edging desert folklore into the realm of blues and rock. One day, he plans to return to Niger to set up a studio and form an international touring band. For now, Toure is merely one of the most riveting African guitarists to be found in the United States.

Recordings from Mali! (Oumar Konate, Noura Mint Seymali and more) Podcast 19

Play

I’m back from the Sahara, and, as promised, have a ton of recordings to share with you.  This special show was originally broadcast on WKCR on 89.9 FM-NY and features rough mixes of studio recordings with up and coming guitarist and pop star Oumar Konate, Griot Royalty Noura Mint Seymali from Mauritania recording exclusively for us in her flat in Timbuktu, artists from Niger informally jamming in their tents and the Festival Au Desert and much, much more. We’ll hear this Takamba band in the photo above- they use a car battery and a PA and the flute ends up sounding just like Jimi Hendrix…

Happy Holidays! A free track from Abdoulaye Diabate/David Ellenbogen

Play
Abdoulaye Diabate

Abdoulaye Diabate from Mali has been called the greatest griot singer living in the United States.

We recorded this duo track in my studio this year and I thought that rather than selling it, I’d like to share it as a holiday gift to show appreciation to current and future friends who have been enjoying this podcast, Acoustic Mandala Project, or life in general.   On this track, Abdoulaye plays rhythm guitar, bass, djembe and sings, I play some rhythm guitar and all the lead guitars.   This is part of a bigger project called Abdoulaye Diabate’s African Ladyland.

I hope you enjoy it and that you have a a wonderful New Year.

Here’s a bio of Abdoulaye from Wikipedia:

Abdoulaye Diabaté was raised in the Mande tradition to a djali family (traditional musicians and story tellers). His brother Kasse Mady has achieved worldwide fame and his sister Mama Diabate is a great star in Guinea. At age 18, having developed into a formidable singer and guitarist he left his village.[1] He joined Tenetemba Jazz in Bemako, the capital of Mali.[1] In 1975, he moved to Abidjan in Ivory Coast where he formed his own band called Super Mande. Super Mande became one of the foremost ensembles in the capital performing all over the country. At times, some now most famous West African stars such as Salif Keita, Mory Kante and Ousmane Kouyate joined the group for performances. The career of Super Mande culminated with the release of their album “Wahabiadashi” which was eventually banned from airplay because the title track criticized hypocritical Marabouts (religious leaders). In the early nineties, Diabate was recruited as a star singer in the world renowned “Ballet Koteba” led by Souleymane Koli to replace Sekou Camara “Cobra” after his death; and also as rhythm-guitarist with the “Go de Koteba” the world famous women group. He toured the world with these ensemble for several years. In 1996, he relocated in New York City. He has since taken part in many cultural events as leader of the re-formed Super Mande group and with many collaborations with artists such as jazzman Don Byron, Peter Apfelbaum, Sean Noonan, and the groups Source and Fula Flute Ensemble.[3]

Music From Samoa – Podcast 9

Play


A couple recordings I made with a mini-disc recorder in Independent Samoa in 2002 0r 2003.  Every Samoan can sing, if you started to sing a song on a public bus everyone would join you.  The houses have thatched roofs and walls of woven leaves that are folded up during the daytime so the breeze sweeps through.   Here are some pics: the father and son are from the Falonga Bay village in Upolo, where I recorded the outstanding youth chours.

Falonga Bay, Upolo, Samoa